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Autism Resources and Community (ARC)

Welcome to the Autism Resources & Community (ARC)!

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      Winner of the Feedspot Top 50 Blogs on Autism Award

      Action Behavior Center's Top 25 Autism blogs of 2020

      Study.com Top Homeschool Blogs for Special Needs Resources

      Applied Behavior Analysis Programs Guide 30 Best Autism Blogs 2019

      Autism Technology

      Autism Treatment Options

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      COVID-19 Emergency Response

      10 Best Practices for Providing Teletherapy for Children with Autism

      How to Provide the Most Effective Teletherapy Possible for Children with Autism

      As schools around the world prepare for learning to continue in the fall, educators and service providers are wondering how to best tackle the possibility or reality of virtual learning for the foreseeable future. Many educators are concerned about the steep learning curve that comes with teletherapy and wonder how they might most effectively reach their students. For special education teachers and therapists for students with autism, teletherapy presents a unique challenge as many learning platforms are only geared towards typically developing students. 

      Updated on 7/26/20 1:35 PM

      Updated by Madeline Burroughs on 7/26/20 1:35 PM

      About Autism

      Advice for Parents and Caregivers

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      Benefits and Strategies for Teaching Art to Children with Autism: Help for Art Challenged Adults Why Art?

      Art therapy provides many benefits for children with autism because it promotes emotional and mental growth as well as independence and collaboration skills. As an outlet for self-expression, imagination, and creativity, art can contribute deeply to improving a child’s fine motor skills, visual and spatial discrepancies, and coping (ActToday.org) For children with autism, art therapy can be particularly effective, especially because many are strong visual learners and process information differently from their typically developing peers.

      Updated on 3/25/20 2:00 PM

      Updated by Madeline Burroughs on 3/25/20 2:00 PM

      Advice for Parents and Caregivers

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      Four Ways to Make Your Backyard More Autism Friendly

      Playing outdoors has huge implications for all children. Many researchers cite outdoor play as being a conduit for decreased stress levels, emotional resilience, increased cognitive functioning, increased attention, as well as a host of other sensory-motor, emotional, and social benefits3.

      Updated on 11/16/19 2:12 PM

      Updated by Madeline Burroughs on 11/16/19 2:12 PM

      Early Childhood Education

      Blending Hands-on & Digital Activities

      Advice for Parents and Caregivers

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      11 Strategies to Help Your Child with Autism Develop Fine Motor Skills

      Fine Motor Skill Milestones

      Fine motor skills are the coordination of small muscle movements. Fine motor skills are the ability to make movements in our eyes, wrists, hands, and fingers. Many everyday tasks require strength, dexterity, and fine motor skills. Fine motor skills need to be learned and developed as children get older.

      Updated on 11/16/19 1:18 PM

      Updated by Chloe Fay on 11/16/19 1:18 PM

      Early Childhood Education

      Advice for Parents and Caregivers

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      12 Popular Games Adapted for Children with Autism

      Play is often described as the “work” of childhood, where children can make friendships, learn social skills, come to understand expected group behavior, consequences, turn taking, and cooperation, not to mention have some fun! Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can reap these same benefits by playing games with other kids, though many do not naturally gain the aforementioned skills simply by being exposed to games or other play objects, as might their non-disabled peers. As with many concepts, games and their component skills may need to be explicitly taught, supported, and adaptations made in order for a child with autism to experience success with the activity.

      Updated on 6/26/19 5:54 PM

      Updated by Jenna Wharff, Ed.M. on 6/26/19 5:54 PM

      About Autism

      Health & Nutrition

      Advice for Parents and Caregivers

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      Top Safety Risks for Children with Autism and How to Communicate with First Responders

      Safety and preparation for emergency situations is a concern for any child, but especially for children with autism, who may be unable to communicate or respond correctly in emergency situations.

      Updated on 4/28/19 3:56 PM

      Updated by Chloe Fay on 4/28/19 3:56 PM

      Early Childhood Education

      Autism and Language

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      The Most Popular Action and Movement Songs for Children with Autism

      Updated on 4/13/19 10:44 AM

      Updated by Leslie Stebbins, M.Ed. M.L.I.S. on 4/13/19 10:44 AM

      Inclusive Education

      Autism & Transitions

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      Inclusion Toolkit: Top Ten Products to Accommodate Students with Autism in the Classroom

      The beginning of a new school year can be a difficult time for some children with autism. Shifting from the comfort of home to an environment packed with loud voices, stiff chairs, slamming doors, and a new structure can trigger anything from distraction and discomfort to full meltdowns.

      Updated on 8/19/18 12:56 PM

      Updated by Emma Shanahan on 8/19/18 12:56 PM

      Early Childhood Education

      Health & Nutrition

      Inclusive Education

      Autism & Emotions

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      Positive Pedagogy: How to Bring Positive Psychology into Special Education and Inclusive Classrooms for Students with Autism

      How can you help your students discover stillness? joy? authenticity?  Positive psychology is the science of well-being, which applied, can bring more positivity and happiness into your classroom. Try investing in these easy “rituals,” or habits, to transform your classroom into an oasis where your students can learn to flourish, no matter their challenges. 

      Updated on 5/10/18 8:42 AM

      Updated by Arianna Riccio on 5/10/18 8:42 AM

      Autism & Transitions

      Advice for Parents and Caregivers

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      How to Choose a Summer Camp for Your Child with Autism

      Summer camp can be a positive and enriching experience for children on the autism spectrum, providing an alternative to the rigorous school year routine and opportunities for peer interactions. However, finding the right fit for your child can be intimidating and does require research and planning - here are some steps to help get you started.

      Updated on 1/15/18 5:59 PM

      Updated by Lauren Panzano on 1/15/18 5:59 PM

      Health & Nutrition

      Advice for Parents and Caregivers

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      Best Sports for Children with Autism

      5 Tips for Helping Your Child Succeed in Sports

      It is no secret that sports are a big part of most people’s lives. More than 100 million people in the United States alone tune in to watch the Super Bowl every year. However, being a sports fan and playing a sport are two completely different things–especially in the eyes of a parent. You probably know enrolling your child in a sport has tremendous benefits such as endurance, strength, and general fitness. But as you might have guessed, for many children with autism, finding the appropriate sport can be challenging.  

      Updated on 2/8/17 8:22 PM

      Updated by Zholl Tablante on 2/8/17 8:22 PM

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      Cool Down Spaces: Best Practices for Managing Challenging Behaviors in the Classroom or the Home

      Parents and teachers can feel confused and uncomfortable when students shout, cry, or act in ways that appear developmentally or culturally inappropriate. It’s helpful to learn who you can turn to for training or advice on behavior management and it’s equally useful to learn a few strategies to help children regulate their emotions and, in turn, their behaviors.

      Updated on 9/19/16 1:13 PM

      Updated by Briana Brukilacchio on 9/19/16 1:13 PM

      Autism and Physical Spaces

      Creating Spaces that Work for Children with Autism

      If you’re like me, there’s nothing more appealing than a home renovation show where a grand reveal shows furniture that is perfectly staged and pristine. As a teacher, this enthusiasm for design and decoration carried over to my classroom even though I was often tasked with making the best out of discarded furniture, fixed bookshelves, and dollar-store items rather than a design team and unlimited budget. Over the years, I learned what design concerns and investments in furniture and materials were worth my time, resources, and energy and what was not.  Ultimately, classrooms are just as, if not more important, than any grand home makeover as it is within those spaces that we, as educators, provide the learning opportunities and experiences of our students.

      Updated on 9/15/16 9:29 AM

      Updated by Rebecca Pagitt-Mungai on 9/15/16 9:29 AM

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      We want to know what you think! Please share your questions and comments about our articles or let us know about other topics you would like to see covered in our blog. --Angela Nelson, CEO, Stages Learning Materials and Editor, Autism Resources & Community