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      Practicing Math and Engineering Skills with Blocks

      Topics: Autism & Preschool Lesson Plans

      Lesson Overview

      Using the Language Builder Blocks and customized dice, children practice math and engineering skills in this creative challenge.

      Download Lesson Plan:

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      Skills Practiced

      • Numerical skills

      • Shape/color recognition

      Materials

      People

      This game is ideally played with one child, or in small groups of 2 to 4 preschool/kindergarten children with either a teacher or a parent.

      Setup

      Decide which shapes and colors you want to review with your child. Use the Tools for Educators dice generator to type in the shape and color of each block. You can make as many dice as your child is comfortable with. See the image below for an example. Before assembling, read the words to your child, and ask him/her to draw with markers that shape under the corresponding words. Then, fold and glue/tape the die together.

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      Procedures  

      1. Explain to the child the he/she is helping to build a brand new city. Ask the child, “What should we build in a city? (Roads, buildings, sidewalks, cars)”
      2. Ask the child to roll the die/dice. Have the child find that matching block and use it to begin his/her construction.
      3. Continue rolling the die/dice until a city is formed. For a faster game, roll multiple dice at a time.
      4. Once the city is constructed, review with the child the names of the shapes used.

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      Sophia Chung

      Written by Sophia Chung

      Sophia Chung is a Masters of Education candidate studying at Harvard Graduate School of Education, focusing on Technology, Innovation, and Education. She is passionate about learning through tinkering, advocating for inclusive education, and storytelling with kids.